Bringing Babo Home

Myoko – a socio-religious festival of Apatani community – will begin from 20th March. That’s just over two months away. The activity has already started. Some clans have already fetched their Babo. Today it was our turn. Tamo-Roto Babo on her way to Bamin village. DSCN4214

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Some more exercise, little merrymaking before lunch
Some more exercise, little merrymaking before lunch
Nico, a frenchman, took the
Nico, a Frenchman, took the second prize in the high jump competition. 🙂

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Landscape

I’m not so good in wide-angle landscape photography. The most common problem I usually find in such photography is haziness, which makes the image very dull. However, I couldn’t control myself from trying out this one time.

On the extreme right side, we can see some of the school buildings, where I teach.

The yellowish patch of bed-ground is ripening paddy field. For some, the harvesting work had already begun at Ziro.

The human population of Siiro village is also growing continuously. as There weren’t many settlements a decade ago. Now we get to see houses distributed throughout the entire frame.

Siiro village
Siiro village

Cross-posted [at] rotochobinphotography.wordpress.com

Gayal

Gayal. In Apatani, we call them “Subu”. And to the Apatani people, it means wealth. It is considered as wealth because it plays important role in economical, social and cultural life of Apatani community of North-East India.

My father used to own a fair numbers when he was still alive, when he was still strong.

Long before he was misdiagnosed with tuberculosis; long before he endured grueling treatment of tuberculosis medicines – he actually had a lung cancer and died from lung cancer – the numbers of gayal dwindled terribly. I was away at boarding school in Delhi. And he couldn’t tend to them like he did it before. Eventually we lost all our bovines to Swpya, or so they say. I don’t know what Swpya really look like. I’ve never seen one in my life – alive or dead. Some call it a wolf. I guess it might be. Anyway, at least they served their purpose of being in the food chain. And served it well.

To make a long story short, Gayals are very fond of salt. The one with tongue out that we’re seeing in a picture was stalking me. Unfortunately, I didn’t carry any salt in my backpack. So I shove my empty hand out at her – hoping without hope to lick it – she licked anyway. The touch of her warm tongue on my palm was healing and divine experience. It reminds me of old times – herding the gayals in the forest with my father.

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Crossposted [at] rotochobinphotography.wordpress.com

A season of harvest

It’s harvest time. The coat of green has changed into golden.

Bustle, bustle, bustle – for the ears are frail and about to drop.

While the sun shines, while the crops are still standing.

Before the plunge of hailstorm, before the spray of October rain.

The farmers are hurrying towards the field.

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Gear: mobile phone camera                                                                                                 

Location: Ziro, India

January is a month of Murung

Penii Iniin is one of the most interesting parts of Murung festival of Apatani community. It is a procession interlaced with both by custom and exhilaration. I guess it is a kind of Brazilian carnival, but of a small size. It doesn’t happen every year, though.

This year, I opted out of Penii as photography seemed more tempting. Hence,

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 For more information on Murung: http://arunachalipr.gov.in/StateFestival_Murung.htm 

An invitation of hike

During a weekend meeting, Dr. Kanno asked me if I want to go for a hike. I was somewhat diffident to join him as I got drenched with rain while I was returning home from my place of work. I thought I was going to catch a cold, but it was an invitation I couldn’t refuse.

The minute I reached home I plugged in my camera to a socket to charge it.

At night, he SMSed me to tell the time of departure.

The next day we were accompanied by three other hikers. One of them was actually going to check the trap he set for the rat at his privately-owned forest. My fellow hikers informed me that Ziro, of late, is experiencing a mass migration of rats. Since the meat of rat is considered as exotic delicacy by many, hence the rat-trap.

I don’t want to bore anyone with the text. . . So please go ahead. . .