Out I go again!

 “If adventure has a final and all-embracing motive, it is surely this: we go out because it is our nature to go out, to climb mountains, and to paddle rivers, to fly to the planets and plunge into the depths of the oceans… When man ceases to do these things, he is no longer man.”    — Wilfrid Noyce

DSCN9294a late night shower restored all the greenness in plant

DSCN9303the slope of a hill fully blanketed with natural colors

DSCN9317couldn’t stop myself from taking a picture of wildflowers

DSCN9328here’s another one

DSCN9338one more

DSCN9349cooked our rice in beer cans

DSCN9358meantime, friends fishing with bare hands in rivulet

DSCN9355the catch

DSCN9373also this…

DSCN9329a friend preparing to cook our catch in a bamboo

DSCN9353roasted bacon – to test the strength our jawbones…

DSCN9380end of the episode

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In pursuit of Salyo Pakhu

A week ago, at a friend’s home, the matter under discussion was Salyo Pakhu (a kind of spice). In the end, my friends and I decided to trek the Gyabu forest for it.

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The frosty track
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Pine grove
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The fern
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The forest
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A friend, a picker
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Salyo Pakhu: the focal point
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To dust we return…
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Group Photo Session, but one of my friends is missing – behind the camera. Yep!
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Bounty
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The fascinations of the nature are eternal.
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In fact, a stream. But we call it ” river “.
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Way back home. The  track at dusk looked quite charming
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The shed by the paddy field.
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The sun leaving a trace, while the moon rapidly rise
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The paddy field. At last, I rest my camera.

An invitation of hike

During a weekend meeting, Dr. Kanno asked me if I want to go for a hike. I was somewhat diffident to join him as I got drenched with rain while I was returning home from my place of work. I thought I was going to catch a cold, but it was an invitation I couldn’t refuse.

The minute I reached home I plugged in my camera to a socket to charge it.

At night, he SMSed me to tell the time of departure.

The next day we were accompanied by three other hikers. One of them was actually going to check the trap he set for the rat at his privately-owned forest. My fellow hikers informed me that Ziro, of late, is experiencing a mass migration of rats. Since the meat of rat is considered as exotic delicacy by many, hence the rat-trap.

I don’t want to bore anyone with the text. . . So please go ahead. . .

Calls of the wild

A day before, rain showered down on the valley. It had moistened the dusty roads. It had washed away all the dirt from the leaves. Finally the forest had come to life again. It flourishes with all the unfathomable colors.

I looked at the emerald hills and got lost. My deep emotion corresponds equally with the beckoning of forest. I asked myself,” What am I doing here in cubicle?” I was not tied up. I was free to tramp for a day in the wilderness (sic) – under the thick canopy of trees, in the midst of ferns.

As I approached their turf, a dash of purplish violet welcomed me and it accompanied me on my trail. Even the skies seemed to be bathed in violet, though the dark clouds were rapidly advancing to fill the entire expanse.

For four hours I walked, listen to the rhymes of brook and tried to capture the details of undergrowth.

In the forest, day really turns to dusk quite quickly. I speed up my pace to get back to the world of oafish and illogical chaos.